152 killer keywords for email subject lines (and 137 crappy ones) | Econsultancy

152 killer keywords for email subject lines (and 137 crappy ones) | Econsultancy.

 

 

Subject Lines
by Parry Malm

We had a hunch that word choice in email subject lines have a strong effect on response rates.  So, we tested 287 keywords across a sample of 2.2bn emails to see which work, and which don’t. 

 

Why? Because President Obama has done more for email marketing than any world leader in the history of mankind. How? By focusing on subject line testing, his digital team optimised their donation campaigns to generate hundreds of millions of dollars online.

Despite Obama’s best efforts, most marketers still view email marketing as the Bluth Company’s Banana Stand of Arrested Development fame: a more boring and less sexy marketing channel than pretty much anything else imaginable.

But – and never forget this – there’s always money in the banana stand! There is great power in optimising subject lines.

In case you missed my presentations at MarketingWeekLive last week, you can find out more about our findings after the jump.

We tested a random sample of 95,000 global, English-language campaigns over the last 12 months (for a total of 2.2bn emails), and have isolated 287 popular ‘trigger words’.

Then, split by sector, we looked at the correlation between the word’s inclusion in the subject line and its variance above or below the average results for key email metrics (Open Rate, CTR, CTOR, and Unsubscribe).

To ensure outliers aren’t confusing things, we’ve also looked at the first, second and third quartiles to give an indication of data spread, not just nominal long-run means.

Bear in mind, these relationships are correlated, but not necessarily causal. There are simply too many variables in an email campaign to pinpoint exact causation. But, where there’s smoke, there’s fire, and at the very least, this will give you many ideas for what to test.

And now some key findings:

People love free stuff

In related news, water is wet. Specific trigger words have a drastic effect on the response rates of offers. For example, ‘Sale’ delivers +23.2% opens, but ‘Save’ only +3.4%.

However, in terms of click throughs, they give +60.7% and -25.2% respectively. When you promote your offers, consider testing those trigger words – it could make or break your campaigns.

And, consider simple quick wins like ‘Free Delivery’ or even ‘% off’ – in the right context these keywords can drive massive response uplifts. But, if you do nothing but hard sell and offer discounts all the time, your customers will become bored and tune out.

Mix up your offer emails in a series of value-adding campaigns.

Content marketing works when the content isn’t crap

The problem with content marketing is the vast majority of content produced is crap. Too many people have outsourced it to agencies that don’t know enough about their clients’ markets, and focus on the wrong metrics. As a result, consumers have become anesthetised to content.

Take, for example, ‘Report’ (-23.7% opens, -54.8% CTR) and Webinar’ (-16.6%, -70.7%.)

Conversely if the content is good, people will consume it. So ‘News’ (+34.8%, +47.7%), ‘Bulletin’ (+15.8%, +12.7%) and ‘Video’ (+18.5%, +64.8%) work well.

Simply put, if your content is crap, it won’t work. If your content is good, you’ll get great results. When doing content marketing, make sure you’re in the latter group, not the former, or else you’ll be what we affectionately call in the industry a “spamming %$*!$#“.

More frequent emails are better than less frequent

Typical for an email guy to say, right? Full disclosure, when people send out more emails, ESPs make more money, this is true. But, if emails drive response and therefore generate revenue, then what’s the problem?

But, don’t take my word for it. We looked at newsletter frequency, and specifically the trigger words that indicate it. ‘Monthly’ brought -26.6% opens and -37.0% clicks. ‘Weekly’ brought +27.1% and +50.6% (not bad) and, amazingly, ‘Daily’ brought +27.8% and +100.3%. Simply put, more email drives more response.

And it’s not just us saying this, check this out if you’re sceptical.

Personalisation works, if your data is clean

Lots of people have played around with subject line personalisation, with varied results. We found the average opens and clicks decrease (-20.7% opens). But, the spread of the data is massive. The first quartile is -73.1%, but the third quartile is +30.8%. Why is this?

The main thing about personalisation is to ensure you don’t deliver users a disjointed user experience. If the subject line is personalised, but the email content isn’t, guess what? You may gain opens, but have done nothing to drive clicks. It leaves users with a negative experience.

Furthermore, if the subsequent online journey isn’t equally personalised, once again you’ve left your users feeling like you’ve given them the old bait-n-switch.

Most importantly, if your database is old and potentially incorrect, you’re in trouble. Eyeball your data first and pick recent, engaged data for testing personalised content.

There’s always money in the banana stand

This report analysed a vast sample of subject lines. More than anything, it showed there is lots of short-run variance in every keyword sample. What matters is that you test things out to your lists, and never stay standing still. What works one week may not work the next, but if you aren’t trying out new things then you’re treading water and ultimately throwing away money.

Email still delivers the strongest revenue of any digital channel by a country mile (source). In all your tweeting, pinning, and facebooking, are you making sure you dedicate enough time to your email subject lines?

Remember – of Obama’s 30 person digital team, 24 of them were focused on email.

They knew that there’s always money in the banana stand.

To see the full list of keywords (287 common words were tested in addition to the ones above), you can download the report. (Registration required – Ed)

 

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Your Online Privacy Is Fair Game, Nonprofit Data Brokering Game Suggests

Your Online Privacy Is Fair Game, Nonprofit Data Brokering Game Suggests.

 

privacy, data brokers, data dealer, cuteacuteOne major privacy issue with our increasingly digital lives comes in the form of data brokers, who gather up all the information we share with various sites, combine it, package it into “insights” about our consumer behavior and sell it to the highest bidder — ostensibly barring specifically illegal uses of the data.

As the template for the NSA’s PRISM, it’s kind of a big deal, yet it seems to bore the bejesus out of most readers.

Would it still bore you in video game format, dear reader? Because a bunch of developers working as a nonprofit are developing just such a game, called Data Dealer, using a Creative Commons license.

The project just closed a successful Kickstarter campaign yesterday. A demo version of the game is live, and the full social version will launch within the “next few months,” according to the website.

In the game, the player is the data broker, scooping up different bits of information on users fromdifferent sources, including some who are not legally allowed to sell the information they’ve got.

“Legal? Illegal? Whatever,” is the game’s tagline.

The player starts with $5,000, and can earn more by selling the profiles.

The game also suggests that data brokers can piece bits of information together, ultimately attaching a person’s real name to what s/he likely believes are anonymous online interactions.

The developers claim that they base “most of the stories in the game” on real events that they unearthed through research that they’ve also made available [pdf].

So stop reading this post already — we know you’re dying to, we watch you in Google Analytics — and go play the demo version of game.

Why Is Google+ So Important For Your ECommerce Website |

Why Is Google+ So Important For Your ECommerce Website |.

 

Google+ has over 100 million users, with slightly less of those users based in the United States. If you’re trying to sell your products to consumers, consider websites beyond Facebook. Google‘s group of small-but-dedicated users might just become your most-loyal customers.

Promoting Your eCommerce Site on Google+

Not only does Google want to promote its own products, but sites such as Facebook and Twitter don’t allow Google to crawl content. If you ignore the fact that Google+ is a social network, it’s one more location for Google to index when the search engine sends its spiders to crawl the Internet.

Google also gives prime real estate to content posted to its social network. When people perform searches when they’re logged in, they’ll see photos, links and posts at the very top of the search results. That content could be yours if you utilize Google+. When you’re promoting your latest sale or special, for example, there’s no better place to appear than the top of the page. Posting links to specific pages on your website to your Google+ profile can give those pages a boost.

Plus, you can add your author tag to content that you post on the Internet. When you write about what’s going on your industry, you build your reputation as an authority. Even if consumers aren’t ready to open their wallets yet, establishing your company as an authority can bring in shoppers in the future.

Content Control

Unlike other social networks, Google+ makes it easy to edit content that you’ve posted. This option doesn’t exist at all with Twitter. If you make a typo or if information changes, you must delete your old tweet and add a new one. Facebook allows limited editing, but Google+ has more options for every post than other social networks by far.

Google+ also lets you choose title text with your posts, which is an important aspect for ranking highly. Quality content helps you go viral, while incorporating keywords into titles can boost your search engine ranking. My experience in creating Google+ campaign for www.paramold.com , eCommerce website from New York, was great. Website has improved rankings big time and attract a lot of new visitors, coming directly from Google+ . 

Videos also get more prominent exposure, and they’re a great way to introduce visitors to your company or CEO. You can provide tutorials, display new products or unbox the newest gaming console just in time for the holidays. Videos also work well for Q&A sessions, which have the added benefit of showing customers that you’re listening to their questions.

Google Keeps You Connected

With Google+, you can connect with other users in more ways than Twitter and Facebook combined. Forget simply mentioning someone in your posts, there are a plenty other ways that you can interact with Google+ users, including:

-Sharing content to them directly or to circles that people belong to

-Commenting on a post that a person has created or commented on

-Tagging someone in a photo

-Comment on a photo someone has tagged or posted or is tagged in

-Invite them to events, send event updates or comment on someone’s event

Hangouts, which Google has just upgraded to replace GTalk, are the final way to connect with visitors, allowing you to do so in real time. You could even use Hangouts for your Q&A sessions because Google+ enables you to really connect with other users and not just advertise to them.

Infographic of the Day: 29 Ways to Stay Creative – SociallyStacked – Everything Social for Small Businesses and Agencies

Infographic of the Day: 29 Ways to Stay Creative – SociallyStacked 

 

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Our goal at Socially Stacked is to create (and share) content that is useful, includes the tips, links and tools that will help ShortStack users and our blog readers solve a problem or reach a goal. But it can be difficult to put out enticing, educational content day after day. That’s one reason we love this list of ways to stay creative.

Hat tip to art director Islam Abudaoud for his simply designed list. We love it! First thing we’re going to try is #9: Listen to new music (does anyone have a Pandora playlist or TurnTable room they want to share with us?). We’re always down with #28 and we’re intrigued by #23: Read a page of the dictionary.

We want to know: how do you stay creative at work? Let us know, on our Facebook Page, of course!

By the Numbers: Why People Become Facebook Fans – SociallyStacked – Everything Social for Small Businesses and Agencies

By the Numbers: Why People Become Facebook Fans – SociallyStacked 

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In March of this year, consulting company Syncapse asked 2,080 fans of 20 major brands (including Disney, Coca Cola, Levi’s, Subway and H&M) why they became Facebook fans of certain brands. Some of the answers might surprise you, e.g. nearly half of Fans like a page because they “support” the brand.

One eye-catching finding from the report is that the average value of a Facebook Fan is $174 (up 28% from 2010), based on spending, loyalty, propensity to recommend, earned media value, acquisition cost and brand affinity.

Here are some other interesting statistics from the study. Some of them might motivate to rethink how you use apps on your Facebook page.

  • • 41% Like a Page to receive regular updates from a brand [Tweet this stat].
  • • 35% Like a Page in order to participate in contests [Tweet this stat].
  • • 31% of Fans Liked a Page so they could “share” their personal good experiences [Tweet this stat].
  • • 27% of Fans LIked a Page so they could share their interests and lifestyle with others [Tweet this stat].
  • • 21% Like a Page when they do research for specific products and services [Tweet this stat].
  • • 20% Like a Page because they see that their friends are already Fans [Tweet this stat].
  • • 18% of Fans say that an advertisement (TV, online, magazine) leads them to specific Pages [Tweet this stat].
  • • 15% of Fans who Like a Page do so because a someone they know recommends the brand [Tweet this stat].

How To Ensure Your LinkedIn Profile is Found in Google

How To Ensure Your LinkedIn Profile is Found in Google.

 

With more than 225 million business individuals now on LinkedIn, there is a growing trend to ensure that a LinkedIn profile is not only created professionally, but can also be discovered by search engines such as Google. As a result of the public nature of the majority of users’ LinkedIn settings, an increasing number of individual profile pages are appearing in search engine results – particularly when searching for, validating or screening the information and expertise of potential candidates.

LinkedInLinkedIn advise that in order to ensure your profile is displayed in search engines like Google, Bing & Yahoo, your profile can be made visible by adjusting your settings, sending out at least one invitation to a business colleague or friend and adding as a minimum, one connection.

In order to ensure your profile is visible you will need to amend your settings. The process should only take a couple of minutes and can be found by going to your profile avatar (picture) in the top right corner and choosing ‘Privacy & Settings’ as an option. Here you can amend who can see your profile picture (‘Change your profile photo & visibility’ and ensure your settings are ‘Everyone’) and ‘Edit Your Public Profile’. Users have a tick list of profile content which you can opt for everyone to see.

Additional Sections:

LinkedIn recommend users to ensure their profile is updated regularly (at least every month if you are wanting to be top of results), as well as checking all additional sections have been correctly filled in. These sections include:

  • linkedin-profile-picture-image_0Attaching a headshot as your profile photo – This should be a professional business photograph. Users should remember that all profile images are searchable on search engines, especially in Google Images. Therefore care should be taken on the choice of image used, perhaps choosing to reflect a corporate element for a business networking site – here are 7 pictures you should NEVER use.
  • Completing your Headline – This is the wording which is shown next to your profile picture and name on LinkedIn. Some people like to customise this to fully reflect your role and act as an aide to stand out from your competitors – it’s shown as a summary in all search results. Here are 10 LinkedIn Headlines that stand out from the crowd.
  • Writing a short description to include in the Summary box – This is similar to a summary of a CV and is meant to be a couple of paragraphs detailing you and your role – make sure you spruce it up!
  • Adding industry specific key words under your job history – If you work within a business sector which has unique industry key words, recruiters will search on those requirements and therefore your profile will show in search results.
  • Entering each of the skills & expertise you possess – This acts as an additional section to add industry specific skills. Care should be taken however to ensure that you only accept skills from individuals endorsing you which are relevant to your business area.

As LinkedIn are constantly changing and updating their offering, a number of optional areas have recently been introduced to complete such as:

Projects:

The option to complete the project name, date, project URL, description and to add all team members relating to that project. This feature could be useful if you are a contractor and working regularly on project-based work. It could be an excellent way to demonstrate the structure, workflow and expertise required for the project.

Languages:

linkedin what you should knowYou have the ability to enter any other languages spoken and the degree of fluency of said language. This could be beneficial if you are interested in moving to work overseas.

Publications:

Individuals utilise this section to mention any publications or editorials written, including the title, publisher, publication URL, and ability to add any other authors. If you work within a niche business area and have written publications on your areas of specialism, this will give recruiters and hiring companies’ visibility of your knowledge and expertise within your industry.

Organisations:

If you belong to any industry organisations, there is the option to enter the organisation name, position held, occupation, time period and any additional notes. Again, for a recruiter this is very useful especially if you were to work within a niche industry or sector.  It will help position your profile as a stronger match on any keyword searches being carried out by recruiting companies.

LinkedIn also gives you the option to add honours & awards, test scores, patents, certifications and any volunteering & causes you work on.

If you want to be discovered by recruiters on LinkedIn, you should ensure that you have completed the following checklist:

  • Is your profile being kept up to date?
  • Have you entered all the relevant information to your current job?
  • Have you completed your skillset?
  • Have you ensured that both your profile and picture are visible to ‘Everyone’?

And finally and perhaps most importantly, ensure the contact details in both the contact box and your profile are visible and up to date.

Author: Vicky Jones (@VixJones) is Head of Marketing & Communications for Montash.

photos by: mariosundar & Coletivo Mambembe

Resource : theundercoverrecruiter.com

10 useful Google Analytics custom dashboards | Econsultancy

10 useful Google Analytics custom dashboards | Econsultancy.

 

 

A bit of customisation always helps if you want to extract maximum value from Google Analytics.

Custom reports are a great way to do this, but custom dashboards also play a useful role, allowing you to view key metrics at a glance and tailor the view to your own needs.

Here I’ve rounded up 10 custom GA dashboards from various sources.

Just click on the link under the screenshots to automatically add these to your Google Analytics profile…

Mobile commerce dashboard

A useful one for tracking your mobile performance from the excellent Justin Cutroni blog.

This one shows a range of valuable data in one screen: mobile revenues, top handsets, top mobile content, keywords and more.

Mobile commerce dashboard

The ‘perfect’ ecommerce dashboard

This, according to Michael Wiegand, is the perfect dashboard for ecommerce sites.

The perfect ecommerce dashboard

Site performance dashboard

This one shows various metrics which may be useful to identify problems on your site.

Performance dashboard

Blogging dashboard

This one from Dashboard Junkie shows some key blogging metrics, including most popular posts, how people find you and where the links are coming from.

Blogger dashboard

Realtime overview dashboard

This one, from Dan Barker, is my go-to realtime dashboard, as it provides a quick, at-a-glance overview of key metrics for bloggers or content marketers, and is more useful than the standard realtime view in GA.

Overview dashboard

SEO dashboard

This one, from Anna Lewis at Koozai, shows key organic search metrics: performance of brannd/non-brand keywords, top landing pages etc.

Lots of handy SEO metrics in one quick view.

SEO dashboard

70 facts about visitors

This is a handy one from Dashboard Junkie, which provides a host of useful information about your visitors: geography, devices, browsers, and so on.

Visitor facts dashboard

Content marketing dashboard

I’m not sure who to credit for this, it’s been on my GA profile for a while.

Content marketing metrics

PPC dashboard

We don’t do a lot of PPC, so the screenshot below probably doesn’t do justice to this dashboard, which gives a general overview of PPC activity.

PPC dashboard

Social media dashboard

Another one from Justin Cutroni, which contains some very useful social data. I particularly like the on-site social actions and socially shared content widgets.

Resource : econsultancy.com